Next →
Unrelated Things
A passion for music.
A love of nerdy things.
Fuel for my life.

Nintendo 3DS FC:
1907 - 8892 - 0621
Theme by Ubhie. Powered by tumblr.

animenostalgia:

This is labeled as a “Sailor Moon Dateline Special from the 90s”, but it’s actually clips of multiple things spliced together:

  • First, an actual Dateline segment called “Moonstruck” from sometime in winter of 1995, talking about how Bandai of America hoped Sailor Moon would be the next big Christmas toy. (It’s also chock-full of mistakes, but you get to see a young Naoko Takeuchi in it.)
  • Next, a clip of Susan Roman and Stephanie Morgenstern (DiC’s Sailor Jupiter & Venus) on the Canadian YTV show The Zone with Phil Guerrero (aka PJ Fresh Phil) about their roles, and doing a little improve. This was probably in ‘95 or ‘96.
  • After that, we get a segment from  CBC’s Undercurrents news show about “the otaku culture”. This one is interesting because it ties “otaku culture”, the internet, and Sailor Moon all together. Not only that, it includes interviews with Hitoshi Doi (of the Seiyuu Database and Hitoshi Doi Anime page, which have been anime staples since 96—and are STILL ONLINE, amazingly), sci-fi author William Gibson, and Greg, the Sailor Mercury super-fan who made one of the first Sailor Mercury webpages on the internet (I believe this is it—Correct me if I’m wrong!) This segment aired on US TV November 22, 1996.
  • Next is a fansubbed interview with Naoko Takeuchi that was originally an omake (extra) from the Japanese home video release in the 90s. She actually talks briefly about how much she’d love to see Sailor Moon made into a live-action sentai series for girls because she loves those types of shows…this was years before the live action Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon!
  • And last but not least is the infamous recording of showing the Toon Maker’s American Sailor Moon promo clip at a panel at Anime Expo in 1998. (In case you’re one of the few people on the internet who hasn’t seen THAT yet…)

This is a really interesting array of clips, and just goes to show you what passed as “reliable information” about anime on American news shows prior to things like Google and Wikipedia.

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 11:36am ϟ 682notes ϟ Reblog→

animenostalgia:

Sailor Moon ep 39 -

"Paired with a Monster: Mako, the Ice Skating Queen" (1993)

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 11:35am ϟ 4notes ϟ Reblog→

bunnyfood:

(via x)

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:26am ϟ 46538notes ϟ Reblog→
nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature
Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.
Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.
Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.
Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.
Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.
While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.
"Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."
Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.
Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.

Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.

Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.

Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.

Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.

While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.

"Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."

Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.

Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:26am ϟ 269notes ϟ Reblog→
Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:24am ϟ 15notes ϟ Reblog→

nmagod:

I

APOLOGIZE

FOR

NOTHING

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:23am ϟ 804notes ϟ Reblog→
me: im adorable like im literally the cutest person in every room i walk into
me 4 seconds later: behold the trash lord
Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:23am ϟ 98305notes ϟ Reblog→

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:21am ϟ 9194notes ϟ Reblog→

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:21am ϟ 22781notes ϟ Reblog→

Posted: Sep 22, 14@ 1:20am ϟ 81627notes ϟ Reblog→